All On Georgia

Case accusing Kemp of bumping voters tossed from court

The groups attempting to pursue a lawsuit accusing Secretary of State Brian Kemp of illegally bumping Georgia voters off the voter rolls will have to find another avenue.

The Georgia NAACP partnered with Common Cause in 2016 to filed the suit saying the state’s method were violations of the National Voter Registration Act. The argument was based on the notion that the state should not decide if a person should be on the voter rolls or not.

U.S. District Judge Timothy C. Batten Jr., made the decision in a 21-page ruling. Specifically, he said the state of Georgia made a “reasonable and nondiscriminatory” approach to attempt to reach voters who had not cast a recent ballot before knocking them from the rolls.

Georgia law requires two mailing notices after a three year period of “no contact” with election officials of the elections office. A thirty-day window is granted and persons who do not respond in that period are ruled “inactive.” Inactive voters are still permitted to vote and are still considered ‘registered.’

After remaining inactive for two federal election cycles, which is generally a total of four years, that person is removed from the voter rolls.

The law permitting Georgia’s procedure for voter rolls has been in place since 1997.